Concerts in the Parkway

A tragic event happened at a Parkway concert, as reported by the Sacramento Bee, but that should not deter the county from continuing to have concerts in the Parkway, as the Parkway always benefits from legitimate use.

We agree completely with the view expressed by Supervisor Serna in the article:

“County Supervisor Phil Serna does not believe concerts should be banned from the parkway. Discovery Park is in the heart of Sacramento’s urban core, providing a unique location for such events, he said.

“It’s incumbent upon the promoter to work with the country parks director to make sure people are safe,” Serna said.”

An excerpt from the Bee article.

After a man died Sunday in a food booth fight at a packed Discovery Park concert, his assailant remained on the loose Monday, Sacramento police said.

At 5:42 p.m. Sunday, 102.5 Live concertgoers alerted fire officials at the event to an assault and that the victim appeared to be unconscious, Officer Matthew McPhail said.

McPhail said it appeared the 31-year-old victim and another man “got into some kind of confrontation” at a food booth. Some witnesses said the victim was knocked to the ground by a punch.

McPhail said no weapons have been linked to the fatal assault….

Stephen Green, president of Save the American River Association’s board of directors, said such large-scale events are environmentally damaging to the parkway and that massive crowds restrict other people’s use of the parkway, Green said, arguing that they should be held at other places such as Cal Expo or Raley Field.

Discovery Park was home for the hard rock Monster Energy Aftershock Festival from 2012 to 2014. The two-day music event drew 19,000 attendees daily in 2014 and moved to the 325-acre Gibson Ranch in 2015 to further expand the event. Discovery Park also was the site of KNCI’s “Country in the Park,” which drew 10,000 in 2007. Organizers of SactoMoFo 9, the annual food truck festival, predict a crowd Saturday that could swell to 25,000.

“Now we have a very strong argument for a restraining order,” Green said, citing Sunday’s incidents. A request for a restraining order to block large-scale events, he said, would be based on the provisions of the American River Parkway Plan, which was approved by the county Board of Supervisors. He said his group had received no county response to its letter, but “I think we will be meeting very soon.”

Karen Doron, a spokeswoman for Sacramento County Regional Parks, said Monday that parks officials were still assessing Sunday’s incidents and it would be premature to say what effect they would have on future events at Discovery Park or other parkway venues. Under a use agreement with the county, the permit holder and concert promoter are responsible for security and traffic control. At Discovery Park, she said, the Sacramento Police Department oversees security in the area where the event is held.

County Supervisor Phil Serna does not believe concerts should be banned from the parkway. Discovery Park is in the heart of Sacramento’s urban core, providing a unique location for such events, he said.

“It’s incumbent upon the promoter to work with the country parks director to make sure people are safe,” Serna said.

About David H Lukenbill

I am a native of Sacramento, as are my wife and daughter. I am a consultant to nonprofit organizations, and have a Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Behavior and a Master of Public Administration degree, both from the University of San Francisco. We live along the American River with two cats and all the wild critters we can feed. I am the founding president of the American River Parkway Preservation Society and currently serve as the CFO and Senior Policy Director. I also volunteer as the President of The Lampstand Foundation, a nonprofit organization I founded in 2003.
This entry was posted in ARPPS, Parks, River Development. Bookmark the permalink.