Rock Festival in Parkway

This festival, as reported by KCRA News, is an excellent legitimate—and profitable—use of the Parkway in an area too often degraded by the illegitimate use by illegal homeless camping and the destruction through fires and pollution resulting from that; plus, the Festival folks pretty much clean up after themselves.

An excerpt.

Thousands of rock fans packed into Discovery Park for day one of the Aftershock Festival Saturday.

FAST FACTS:

Aftershock Festival hosts 23,000 per day in sold-out weekend show

Festival rents Discovery Park for $70,000, spends $2 million in community, organizers said.

Festival back at Discovery Park because of traffic woes at Gibson Ranch in 2015

“It’s awesome. Discovery Park is beautiful, and you know, who wouldn’t want to play here. Downtown Sacramento is where it’s at,” said Brandon Mendenhall, member of the band The Mendenhall Experiment, who performed Saturday night.

This is the fifth year for the rock festival, and the first year back at Discovery Park after hosting it at Gibson Ranch last year.

“We couldn’t overcome the traffic problems. It’s a beautiful park, it had a bigger capacity there, and it was a great neighborhood, but we have a saying that your experience starts and stops with parking,” said Danny Hayes, CEO of Danny Wimmer Presents and organizer of the music festival.

With parking plus shuttles from Sleep Train this year, fans say getting to aftershock was a breeze.

“I like this location a lot better. It’s really accessible (and) it’s right off the freeway,” attendee Shawn Samboceti said.

One resident we met at the park, who didn’t want to be on camera, raised concerns about a private event using a public space for a concert of this scale.

Event organizers lease the park every year from the county for $70,000 per weekend.

“We pay for the park, we pay the park rangers, we hire the police, we hire the bartenders (and) we spend over $2 million in the community supporting this festival,” Hayes said.

About David H Lukenbill

I am a native of Sacramento, as are my wife and daughter. I am a consultant to nonprofit organizations, and have a Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Behavior and a Master of Public Administration degree, both from the University of San Francisco. We live along the American River with two cats and all the wild critters we can feed. I am the founding president of the American River Parkway Preservation Society and currently serve as the CFO and Senior Policy Director. I also volunteer as the President of The Lampstand Foundation, a nonprofit organization I founded in 2003.
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