Sacramento Makes Decent Score in Best Cities Study

We came in at 24th of 62 in this study posted on Wallet Hub.

An excerpt.

Many Americans prefer to live in rural areas, but far more call cities their homes. Though urban settings are less than 3 percent of the U.S. landmass, they contain around 80 percent of the total U.S. population.

There are many factors that make highly-populated areas great to live in. Big cities represent opportunity, economic and otherwise, which appeals to people of all walks of life – especially young professionals seeking advancement in their careers and social lives. Another main draw is easy access to diverse dining and entertainment options that are comparatively scarce in more rural settings.

But big-city life requires tradeoffs, too. Higher cost of living is a concern, along with pollution, traffic delays and limited living space. Each major U.S. city has a unique set of issues, to go along with its own character and charm. However, some big cities tackle their problems and emphasize their strengths more efficiently than others.

To help readers find the best big city to call home, WalletHub compared the 62 largest U.S. cities based on 56 key indicators of attractiveness. Our data set ranges from the quality of public schools and life expectancy to job opportunities and property taxes. Read on for our findings, insight from a panel of experts and a full description of our methodology.

Retrieved July 30, 2018 from https://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-large-cities-to-live-in/14358/?utm_

About David H Lukenbill

I am a native of Sacramento, as are my wife and daughter. I am a consultant to nonprofit organizations, and have a Bachelor of Science degree in Organizational Behavior and a Master of Public Administration degree, both from the University of San Francisco. We live along the American River with two cats and all the wild critters we can feed. I am the founding president of the American River Parkway Preservation Society and currently serve as the CFO and Senior Policy Director. I also volunteer as the President of The Lampstand Foundation, a nonprofit organization I founded in 2003.
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